A friend once asked me if I’d been raised in any particular faith.

Mostly, I said, I grew up believing in fairy tales.

I tended to believe the good guy would win and that the bad guy would be defeated – but that it would involve the good guy doing all the right things. He had to listen to the people who wanted to help him. He had to find the right tools and the right people who knew the right keys to the right doors. And if he turned greedy or cruel or unkind he was punished until he figured out how to be the good guy again.

The older I got, the more often I was told that following these basic tenants was no way to run a business.

I think they’re wrong.

This website discusses why I think living a hero’s life is worthwhile, and chronicles my own attempts to come up with better ways to live and run a business. I often delve into mythology and folktales to do it, not because I think such stories are meant to be taken literally, but because I think they were created to demonstrate good ways to live, from older folk to the younger ones.

Every story more or less boils down to this: live a good life, and the monsters cannot touch you. It is possible to be too good to fail.

Who Am I?

I’m Taylor Lindstrom, and I’m a writer living in Boulder, CO.

 

There Are Three Portals. Choose Wisely

THE APOLOGUE: WHAT CAME BEFORE

I grew up believing in stories the way some believe in God.

Stories were how I learned what was good and what was wrong. They were how I discovered there was a greater purpose to one's life than simple, immediate pleasures. Stories taught me that there were always keys to all the doors, that there were always words that would grant safe passage.

Stories taught me that there was such a thing as a hero's life, and that it was the only one worth living.

Go on.

THE LETTER: VIGNETTES AND VARIATIONS

Between each story I think a lot. I scratch out drafts, change words, decide to tell it through someone else's eyes. Every morning, I write out a sketch of what I'm trying to grasp, and over time it's taken the form of a letter.

These letters are personal, unpolished, and precarious. They're also where you'll first hear about new unfurlings as I create them. If this all sounds like your brand of whiskey, tell me your name, and give me a place where letters of this sort can be received.

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